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New Quebec Facility Converts Forest Residuals to Fuel


Honeywell and Ensyn Corp are constructing a new renewable fuels facility in Port Cartier, Quebec that will incorporate technology from the companies’ joint venture, Envergent Technologies LLC. The project, known as Cote Nord, is being developed by Ensyn, Arbec Forest Products Inc. and Groupe Remabec.

Envergent provides users with practical, commercially proven solutions for green energy. The RTP™, or rapid thermal processing technology, is a fast thermal conversion process that converts lower-value forest and agricultural biomass from local sources into RTP green fuel—a light, pourable, clean-burning, liquid biofuel.

This fuel, which is virtually carbon-neutral, provides a sustainable and cost-effective alternative for institutional and industrial heating. The converted forest residues can serve as a renewable feedstock for producing low-carbon transportation fuels.

Because RTP green fuel is made from non-edible woody biomass, its production does not compete or interfere with materials used in the cultivation of food and animal feeds. The optimized, pre-commercial forest thinning strategies utilized for its production reduce the risk of forest fires and enable enhanced forest management practices.

Cote Nord is the first of several production plants under development by Ensyn and its partners to expand the production of RTP green fuel for energy applications. When the facility is completed in late 2017, it will convert 65,000 dry metric tons per year of forest residues to approximately 10 million gallons—or 40 million liters—per year of RTP green fuel.

Widespread adoption of this fuel can have significant environmental benefits, including displacement of conventional fossil fuels and a net reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. Also, transportation fuels such as gasoline and diesel that are made from RTP green fuel have a carbon intensity that is close to 70 percent less than petroleum-based fuels.