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SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Preparing the next generation of engineers to be tomorrow’s leaders.


The Honeywell Initiative for Science and Engineering gives students direct access to Nobel Prize-winning laureates in chemistry and physics, as well as Honeywell’s top technologists and recruiters who help students discover exciting engineering careers in areas such as aerospace, automation and controls, energy, safety and security. Students participate in lectures, round-table discussions and informal interactions with laureates. Since 2008 the program has been presented to universities in China, the Czech Republic, India, Malaysia, Mexico, Romania and the United States.
 
 

UPCOMING EVENTS




 

Northwestern Polytechnical University


Xi'an, China
October 12, 2018

RECENT EVENTS

 Click here to see the videos from previous events.

 
NOBEL LAUREATES

Aaron Ciechanover

Prof. Aaron Ciechanover

Professor Aaron Ciechanover is a Distinguished Research Professor at the Technion - Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa. He won the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 2014 for the discovery of ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation. His many awards include the Albert Lasker Award and the Israel Prize, and is a member of the Israeli National Academy of Sciences and Humanities and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, among others.

Prof. Ciechanover received his M.Sc. and M.D. from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, and his D.Sc. from the Technion.
Albert Fert

Prof. Albert Fert

Albert Fert is Scientific Director of a joint laboratory of CNRS and Thales, Emeritus Professor at University Paris-Sud, and member of the French Academy of Sciences.

He won the Nobel Prize in physics in 2007 for the discovery of giant magnetoresistance and his contribution to the development of spin electronics, or spintronics. His many awards include the International Prize for New Materials of the American Physical Society, the Gold Medal of the French National Scientific Research Center, the Grand Prix de Physique Jean Ricard of the French Physical Society, and the Gay-Lussac Humboldt Award.

Prof. Fert earned his Sc.D. and Ph.D. in physics from the Orsay Faculty of Sciences of the University of Paris.
Claude  Cohen

Claude Cohen-Tannoudji

Claude Cohen-Tannoudji is Professor of Atomic and Molecular Physics at the Collège de France in Paris. He won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1997 for his work on the cooling and trapping of atoms with laser beams. He has received the Académie des Sciences’ Ampère Prize, the Institute of Physics’ Thomas Young Medal and Prize, the Optical Society of America’s Charles Townes Award, and the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique Gold Medal.

He received his Ph.D. in physics at Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris.
David Gross

Prof. David Gross

David Gross is the holder of the Frederick W. Gluck Chair in Theoretical Physics at the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics of the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is also a faculty member in the UC Santa Barbara Physics Department and is currently affiliated with the Institute for Quantum Studies at Chapman University in California.

He won the 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics for the discovery of asymptotic freedom. His many awards include the Dirac Medal, Harvey Prize, and is a recipient of a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship.

Professor Gross received his Bachelor's and Master's degrees from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel, and his Ph.D. in physics from the University of California, Berkeley.
Eric Cornel

Prof. Eric Cornell

Professor Eric Cornell is a physicist with the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Professor Adjoint in the Physics Department of the University of Colorado, and Fellow of JILA, a joint institute of NIST and CU. He won the Nobel Prize in physics in 2001 for the achievement of Bose-Einstein condensation in dilute gases of alkali atoms, and for early fundamental studies of the properties of the condensates. His many awards include the Rabi Prize of the American Physical Society, the King Faisal International Prize for Science, the Lorentz Medal, and the Benjamin Franklin Medal in physics.

Prof. Cornell received a B.S. in physics from Stanford University, and his Ph.D. in physics at the Massachusetts Institute for Technology.
George Smith

Prof. George Smoot

Professor George Smoot leads a group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California at Berkeley in observing the galaxy and the cosmic background radiation caused by the fiery beginning of the universe. He was co-awarded the 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics "for discovery of the blackbody form and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation.” Professor Smoot is an author of more than 200 science papers and is co-author of the popularized scientific book Wrinkles in Time.

Smoot received Bachelor degrees in mathematics and physics and a Ph.D. in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Jerome Friedman

Prof. Jerome I. Friedman

Jerome Isaac Friedman is an Institute Professor and Professor of Physics Emeritus at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

He received the Nobel Prize in physics in 1990 for the experimental discovery of quarks. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society. He has been a member of numerous advisory committees for the US Department of Energy and various laboratories and universities in the US and abroad.

Prof. Friedman received his A.B., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in physics at the University of Chicago.
Robert Laughlin

Robert B. Laughlin

Professor Robert B. Laughlin is the Anne T. and Robert M. Bass professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences and on the physics faculty at Stanford University. He is co-winner of the 1998 Nobel Prize in Physics for his theoretical work on the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect. He is the recipient of numerous other awards, including:

• U.S. Department of Energy's Earnest O. Lawrence Award for Physics
• American Physical Society's Oliver E. Buckley Prize
• Franklin Institute's Benjamin Franklin Medal for Physics

Laughlin earned his Ph.D. in physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and A.B. in Mathematics at the University of California at Berkeley.
Robert Woodrow Wilson

Dr. Robert Wilson

Dr. Robert Wilson is a senior scientist at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

He won the Nobel Prize in physics in 1979 for the discovery of the cosmic microwave background radiation caused by the Big Bang that began the universe. His awards include the Henry Draper Medal of the National Academy of Sciences.

Dr. Wilson received his B.S. in physics at Rice University, and M.S. in physics at the California Institute of Technology.
Stephan Hell

Prof. Stefan Hell

Prof. Stefan Hell is a Director at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Göttingen, where he leads the Department of NanoBiophotonics. He is also a Director at the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research in Heidelberg, where he leads the Department of Optical Nanoscopy. In 2014 he shared the Nobel Prize in chemistry for the development of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy. He has won numerous awards, including:

• Julius Springer Prize for Applied Physics 2007
• Körber European Science Prize, 2011
• Kavli Prize, 2014

Hell received his Master’s diploma and doctorate in physics from the University of Heidelberg.
Wolfgang Ketterle

Prof. Wolfgang Ketterle

Professor Ketterle is Associate Director, Research Laboratory of Electronics, Director, MIT-Harvard Center for Ultracold Atoms, and the John D. MacArthur Professor of Physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Prof Ketterle won the Nobel Prize in physics in 2001 for the achievement of Bose-Einstein condensation in dilute gases of alkali atoms, and for early fundamental studies of the properties of the condensates. His more recent achievements have included the creation of a molecular Bose condensate, an experiment providing evidence for "high temperature" super fluidity in a fermionic condensate, and Bose-Einstein condensation in synthetic magnetic fields.

Ketterle received his Master’s and Ph.D. in physics from the Technical University of Munich