8 Ways to Keep Kids Safer This Summer

Don’t play with fire – a few easy steps can make all the difference

From fireworks to s’mores, summer is filled with fun and you can prevent potential fire dangers.

Before you step out to enjoy the activities, educate your family and kids about fire safety at home, during camping and at a fireworks event.

According to data from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 87 percent of all fire-related deaths are due to home fires, which spread rapidly and can leave families as little as two minutes to escape once an alarm sounds. For more than ten years, Honeywell and Safe Kids Worldwide have partnered to protect children from preventable injuries in the United States, China, India and Malaysia. Here are some fire safety tips for you to use this summer so you can sit back, relax and enjoy the show.

In 2013, 334 children died in home fires. Eighty-seven percent of all fire-related deaths are due to home fires, which spread rapidly and can leave families as little as two minutes to escape once an alarm sounds. Fires are not just a problem in the United States. In 2008, nearly 61,000 children around the world died due to a fire or burn. Source: Safe Kids Worldwide – Burns and Fire Safety Fact Sheet (2015)

Go with glow sticks: Never let small children hold a lit sparkler, which can heat up to 1,200-degrees. Instead, let young children use glow sticks.

In case of emergency: Campfire or backyard barbecue? Always have a bucket of water and/or a fire extinguisher nearby. Know how to operate the fire extinguisher properly.

Install and periodically check smoke alarms: The very first step to staying safe is installing smoke alarms on every level of your home and in every sleeping area. Working smoke alarms reduce the chances of dying in a fire by nearly 50 percent. Regular periodic checks are mandatory in order for them to be effective. Install our smoke detectors today.
  
Don’t play with fire: Teach kids never to play with matches and lighters. Make a habit of placing these items up and away from young children.

Practice fire drill: Create and practice a home fire escape plan with two ways out of every room in case of a fire. Get a stopwatch and time how fast your family can escape. Here’s a handy worksheet to get you started.

Child Prep: Children should know how to respond to the sound of a smoke alarm. Teach them to get low and get out when they hear it. Watch the video to learn more.

Common sense:
Limit distractions in the kitchen and don’t leave a hot oven or stovetop unattended.

Fire-off: Blow out candles before you leave the room or before you go to sleep.


Cecilia Tejeda

Honeywell Hometown Solutions

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